Our Mission

It is the mission of Wellborn Special Utility District to provide an adequate and sustainable supply of safe, high quality drinking water to the residents and businesses located within our geographically defined service area.  As the service area continues to grow, it is the commitment of the District, through careful planning, to meet the challenge of future demand at the most efficient cost to the customers.

Bill Payment Options

Looking for the most convenient way to pay your bill? We offer a wide variety of payment options to our customers. Simply choose the option that best suits your needs... Learn more...

Conservation Tips

There are a number of easy ways to save water, and they all start with you. When you save water, you save money on your utility bills. Here are just a few ways... Learn more...

Recent News

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Land Use Assumptions and Capital Improvements Plan Relating to possible Adoption of Impact Fees

Please Click Here for more information on Wellborn's LUA and ClP. 

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Winging South for the Winter

Winging South for the Winter

As the days grow shorter and the nights grow colder; as long, languid summer melts into crisp, cool autumn; as nature takes on russet hues and puts on fancy dress; as you marvel at the beauty of the season, don’t forget to look up. One of nature’s great marvels is the show in the sky as the birds of North America migrate south. Migration is the annual movement of birds, often north and south along a flyway, between their breeding grounds and their wintering grounds. One of the best known, and certainly the most familiar, of North America’s migrators is the Canada (not “Canadian”) Goose (Branta canadensis).  The impressive V-formations of Canada geese flying south are seen all over North America; indeed, Canada geese are found in every one of the contiguous United States and every Canadian province. However, they are not our only journeying birds. “Of the more than 650 species of North American breeding birds, more than half are migratory.” Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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